PRC, 10 tips, and tricks

Hi all 

Writing a feature story can be tough! Here are a few tips to make it a breeze.

1. “WHAT IS A FEATURE STORY?

A feature takes an in-depth look at what’s going on behind the news.

It gets into the lives of people.

It tries to explain why and how a trend developed.

Unlike news, a feature does not have to be tied to a current event or a breaking story. But it can grow out of something that’s reported in the news.”- Ryan

2. “Identify the sources and collect all the relevant information. If you can, take surveys. You can request people to fill in questionnaires or take interviews, sift through them and retain whatever is necessary.”-Ehow

3. “Follow a systematic path of presenting the feature story with an introduction, main body and the ending highlighting the purpose that you have already thought about. Weave a proper and continual thread to keep the reader glued to your writing.”-Ehow

4. “Give a human touch to the feature story as deemed fit to make it more interesting. The plot should build up tension and not be boring.”-Ehow

5. “Avoid lengthy, complex paragraphs. Your article will appear in columns, so one or two

sentences equals a paragraph.”-Econnect

6. “Write what the editor wants to publish, not what you want to write. How do you find out?

Study the editorial and staff writers’ pieces – they are aimed precisely at the publication’s

target audience.”-Econnect

7.”Move your story along with descriptions of what happened, quotes from people involved in the issue, and details that place the reader in the midst of the action. Make sure your ending is meaningful. Your closing words should make an impact on your readers and tie the various strands of your story together.”-Ryan

8. “Evaluate it as neutral reader as it can help improve the overall presentation of the feature story. Get a second opinion from your friends or colleagues and encourage constructive criticism of your write-up.”-Ehow

9.  “A picture sells the story – offer good quality images as prints, transparencies or digital

files. Check with the editor for the preferred option”-Econnect

10. “Let the relevant person (editor/deputy editor) in the print media outlet know you are

sending them an article. Follow this up with a phone call a week or so later.”-Econnect

Sources Cited:
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3 Comments

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3 responses to “PRC, 10 tips, and tricks

  1. This is a really well written article! I like how you started off really simple, “What is a feature story.” One thing that always kills me when I am trying to learn a new trade or what not is the fact they start teaching you and assume you know all the beginner level stuff. I used to be film major and I remember first trying to understand and use Final Cut Pro was the most daunting task because every tutorial I found assumed you knew all the basic. News flash, I didn’t. Moral of my rant, I appreciate the fact you started simple.

  2. This is a great and informative post. I love the tips you provided. A couple that stood out to me were ” ‘Write what the editor wants to publish, not what you want to write. How do you find out?
    Study the editorial and staff writers’ pieces – they are aimed precisely at the publication’s
    target audience.’-Econnect ” and ” ‘A picture sells the story – offer good quality images as prints, transparencies or digital files. Check with the editor for the preferred option’-Econnect.” It is easy to forget that you are writing an article for a publication and therefore have to follow their standards. You can use your own voice when writing your own blog but when submitting something to a publication you need to keep in mind what the editor wants. That was great advice. When it comes to pictures, I guess the saying is right. A picture is worth a 1000 words. Having a good quality image can say more about the piece than the writing.

  3. Pingback: Blog Comments « Fancy Free Public Relations

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